Conventional vs. Stand Development

Since I returned to doing film photography I've been doing most of my developing using a technique called "stand development." Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stand_development for more details, but the general idea is to dramatically reduce the amount of agitation while the film is in the developer while increasing the amount of time in the developer to compensate. My particular formulae have been 10 minutes agitated every minute for conventional vs. 20 minutes agitated only at the beginning of development for stand development. These numbers are for Kodak HC-110 diluted 63 parts water to 1 part developer at 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

For the most part I've been pleased with the results I get with stand development, that is until recently when I've started noticing dark and light bands in some of my photos. At first, mostly because of the regularity of the bands, I thought this was an artifact of scanning the negatives, but then Andi said she had occasionally seen the same thing in some of her photos, and she is using a different scanner (an Epson V500).

So as an experiment I decided to develop my most recent roll of film using conventional development. The result is that I'm not able to detect any bands. The regularity of the bands makes me question this result, and so I'm still not willing to say that stand development is the culprit. But for now I'm going stick with conventional development.

In the accompanying photos, I conventionally developed the iPhone 6 photo and stand developed the photo of Andi. Notice the vertical bands in the snow below Andi and the lack of vertical bands in the sky above the buildings.

Andi Loading Film (Stand Development)

Andi Loading Film (Stand Development)

iPhone 6 (Conventional Development)

iPhone 6 (Conventional Development)